DVT & Diet

DVT & Diet

How careful eating can help you boost your body’s defenses to DVT in Atlanta

When it comes to preventing deep vein thrombosis, you may have heard most about how important it is to stretch your legs and avoid a sedentary lifestyle. Long hours at the office, on a plane or in a hospital bed can spell trouble if you don’t take steps to get your legs moving, but this isn’t the only thing you can do to prevent DVT in Atlanta. As with most aspects of wellness, cardiovascular health depends just as much on your diet as it does on exercise.

Small dietary changes can add up to a big difference when it comes to preventing DVT. Limiting your consumption of saturated fat is important, as this will help you keep blood cholesterol levels low to prevent the plaque buildup that narrows your arteries and hampers circulation.

Because saturated fat comes primarily from animal sources, cutting down on the amount of fatty meats and dairy products in your diet can be a big help. Though these foods make up a large slice of many American diets, there are many things you can eat in their place to promote heart health and prevent deep vein thrombosis:

  • Fish. Salmon, herring, mackerel and many other fish do contain fats, but they’re omega-3 fatty acids, which are widely considered beneficial for the body. Increasing your omega-3 intake may help you reduce your risk of blood clots, lower your blood pressure and reduce blood triglyceride levels, making fish a better choice for dinner than most other proteins.
  • Soy. Products like tofu, tempeh and soy milk have long been admired among health food advocates for their ability to balancing cholesterol levels, and they are valuable substitutes for meat and dairy. Though increasing your soy intake can help you raise levels of HDL cholesterol (or “good” cholesterol), soy products also contain a compound called phytoestrogen that can lead to hormonal issues if eaten in high quantities, so be sure to keep the amount of soy in your diet within reason.
  • Fiber. This important nutrient comes in two different varieties: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber has been shown to lower your blood sugar and blood cholesterol levels, while insoluble fiber contributes to heart disease prevention. Fiber can come from countless different sources, but your best bet in getting enough is to eat more whole grains, legumes and fresh fruits and veggies.

As you do your best to avoid DVT in Atlanta, remember: what you feed your body is just as influential as how much you move it. For more tips on keeping your cardiovascular system strong with a healthy diet, talk to Dr. Perry.

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